TEACHING & ADVISING

COURSES I teach include International Human Rights Law, International Law, Comparative Law, Global Democracy and Social Justice, International Relations, Comparative Politics, American Government, and American Constitution.

In recognition of my teaching, I was nominated for a 2020 University Teaching Excellence Award and received a letter of commendation from the provost.

34 of my students have published their coursework in journals and blogs, including Harvard Human Rights JournalOxford Human Rights HubOxford University Politics Blog, E-International Relations, and Intersect: The Stanford Journal of Science, Technology, and Society (indexed in Google Scholar).

I am grateful for the support of the College of William & Mary University Teaching and Learning Project in helping design two new courses: Global Democracy and Social Justice in Fall 2019 and International Human Rights Law in Fall 2018. Student publications from those and other courses are below.

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS

I am particularly interested in advising students on conducting research and publishing in the areas of international law, human rights, legal theory, democracy and democratic theory, international relations, monetary theory, and international political economy, drawing on feminist, critical race, critical class, postcolonial, and intersectional approaches.

 

Below is a selection of work students did in my courses and got published.

Cover163x226.jpg

CO-AUTHORED HUMAN RIGHTS REPORT

“The Human Right to Democratic Control of Artificial Intelligence: Report to the Australian Human Rights Commission on the 'Human Rights and Technology: Discussion Paper,'” American University Digital Research Archive, doi: 10.17606/8f4f-8k38 (April 2020).

Student-led, co-authored human rights report.

Submission to the Australian Human Rights Commission in response to their call for submissions regarding the Commission's "Human Rights and Technology: Discussion Paper" (December 2019).

Abstract

Rapid advances in artificial intelligence (AI) will accelerate the concentration of authoritarian power and increase systemic inequality and discrimination unless there is democratic control of AI. Democratic control of AI requires control by citizens' assemblies, decision-making bodies comprised of randomly-selected individuals who hear from experts and have the power to determine AI law and policies. Citizens' assemblies have a proven record of success in securing democratic control of public policy-making in Ireland, Iceland, Canada, Australia, and elsewhere.

Read More

cover_issue_71_en_US_edited.jpg
hhrj logo.jpg

ANGELE MARICAR

"Human Rights are Refugee Rights:

The Protection of Economic Rights for Refugees in the United States"

Harvard Human Rights Journal Blog, Harvard Law School, April 20, 2020

All refugees should receive the same economic rights, including the right to employment, fair wages, and economic stability.... Violations of these legal standards often include the state’s failure to provide favorable employment opportunities, fair economic wages, and a sufficient amount of resettlement programs and support systems.

Read More

Oxford Human Rights Hub.jpg

ZOHA ZAFAR

"Protecting Indigenous Communities in Cases of Climate-forced Migration"

Oxford Human Rights Hub Blog, University of Oxford, Faculty of Law, May 22, 2020

On Indigenous People’s Day in 2018, the United Nations pushed for the protection of indigenous populations’ human rights  in cases of social, political, economic, and climate-forced migration. It fell short of acknowledging that victims of climate-related forced migration receive limited protections under international law as compared to social, economic, and political migrants. Previous constructions of climate-related migration rely on the assumption of other contributing factors. Indigenous communities experiencing climate migration face decreased representation, limited opportunities for economic participation and decreased protection of property. This blog highlights the need for the enactment of proactive measures necessary to preserve indigenous communities experiencing climate-forced migration.

Read More

e-ir.jpg

TANISHKA TALAGADADEEVI

"How Coronavirus Exposes Unequal Access to Education in America"

E-International Relations

April 30, 2020

The pandemic must serve as a wake-up call for legislators and school board members; far too many students are being disadvantaged by a lack of Internet access. This issue will not only affect students during their time in primary and secondary education but will continue to follow them into higher education. Their peers, many of whom have been privileged with high-speed access and their own laptops, have received a different education. As suggested by the U.N. report on the Right to Internet Access, access to Internet is an educational issue, a feminist issue, an economic issue, and a racial issue.

Read More

oxpollogo.jpg

NATHAN MESSER

"Why More Needs to be Done to Defend Internet Access"

The Oxford University Politics Blog, Oxford University Department of Politics and International Relations, January 13, 2020

Internet access has been a controversial issue; in the U.S., many people believe in the notion that "internet access is a privilege." ... Allowing governments to restrict internet access infringes on several human rights. ... It is time that the international community adopts a more serious approach to defending internet access and discourages both governments and companies from restricting citizens’ access to the internet.

Read More

Unasdftitled.jpg

ALEXANDER TONG

"Why Federalists Should Support the Legalization of Marijuana in America"

International Affairs Forum

April 18, 2020

The legalization of marijuana for medicinal and recreational purposes, at the federal level, would prove beneficial to both the state and its people. ... By adopting such a system and implementing on a nation-wide scale, Federalists can achieve their goal of centralizing legislative power within the federal government, resolve the abuses of the war on drugs, profit off the fastest growing industry in the US job market, and, in the process, enjoy the medicinal and recreational benefits of legal cannabis.

Read More

GUULR.jpg

ALEXANDRA BYRNE

"Adequate, Effective, and Prompt: Analyzing the Right to Reparations in Transitional Justice," 

Georgetown University Undergraduate Law Review, Vol. VI, Issue 1 (Spring 2020), pp. 1–13

Abstract

The right to reparations is clearly defined in international law as a human right, though no framework and little precedent exists to guide reparations programs and ensure their implementation. This paper argues that the right to reparations is a customary norm of international law and should be fulfilled with the same urgency and adequacy of other customary norms. I compile a formula for reparations implementation based on three case studies of past reparations programs. This formula consists of lost income, lost assets, and costs of medical, legal, and psychological services. Finally, I develop a timeframe for reparations implementation by region based on household wealth and yearly expenditure. Based on these findings, I make several recommendations as to how governments should proceed when establishing reparations programs that comply with international law and the basic principles of human rights.

Read More

Unasdftitled.jpg

ALEXANDRA BYRNE

"It is Time for Reparations"

International Affairs Forum, January 16, 2020

As described in the United Nations General Assembly resolution, Basic Principles and Guidelines on the Right to a Remedy and Reparation for Victims of Gross Violations of International Human Rights Law and Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law, reparations should be “adequate, effective and prompt reparation for harm suffered.” ... Requests for reparations should be handled with haste and all eligible populations should be notified and informed of their rights. Post-transition agencies should be created to specifically handle these requests.

Read More

Unasdftitled.jpg

SHAWKY NABIL DARWISH

"Yes, It's Time for Reparations"

International Affairs Forum, May 2020

Lorde is quite right. The fact of the matter is that in our capitalist system, those without resources simply die off. And given the fact that white Americans have been given (and are still receiving) their ~400 year head-start on Black Americans, the system we have is a slow but steady insurance policy against equality. Is this starting to make sense?

 

And when we all finally agree that reparations probably should finally be repaid to Black Americans, someone inevitably shoots up in the back of the room with a grin and a “How are we ever going to afford this?” Seriously? To start, reparations has been used by the United States government before, in the case of those affected by Japanese Internment, each individual received direct compensation of $20,000, or $42,000 adjusted for inflation. The use of direct reparations for Japanese-Americans, and the refusal of reparations for African-Americans, highlights the American tradition of assuming Black people don’t know how to spend their own money. And second, let’s not pretend that Congress didn’t just pull $2 trillion dollars out of its marble ass for COVID-19. We have the money, so let’s do what’s right.

Read More

NYU.jpg

SANAM ANALOUEI

"Economic Sanctions: An Illegal Use of Force from the United States, and an Attack on the Economic, Social and Cultural Rights of Iranian Women"

The Undergraduate Law Review at New York University, Vol. II, Issue 2 (Spring 2019)

Abstract

Throughout history, sanctions have become an increasingly popular tool in attempting to
change state behavior without having to go to war. President Woodrow Wilson once described
economic sanctions as a “peaceful, silent, deadly remedy.” Only a century later, the United States
has continued to impose sanctions despite knowing their deadly results. In this paper, I argue that
given international obligations and norms, the U.S.’s use of economic sanctions, specifically those
on Iran, violates basic human rights principles. Moreover, the U.S. has consistently ignored calls
for reform within their use of sanctions, which would halt the violation of human rights imposed
by such sanctions. Research has shown that economic sanctions have harmful, even disastrous
effects on humanitarian relief and quality of life for populations in targeted countries. However,
research has also often failed to recognize that sanctions do not affect populations equally:
sanctions result in gendered outcomes, with women suffering the most. This is not to say that men
do not also experience hardship under sanctions, but rather, that there are often unintended
gendered effects that especially hurt women. This paper will also examine the gendered effects of
economic sanctions on the economic, social, and cultural rights of Iranian women by referencing
documents such as the UDHR, ICESCR, ICCPR, CEDAW, and several General Comments and
Special Rapporteur reports. The United States has historically been the largest abuser of economic
sanctions abroad; the current administration has not differed immensely in the long-standing
economic sanction policies on Iran.

Read More

GUULR.jpg

JESSE ERNEST

"Navigating Free Speech and Social Order:

An International Case Study on Protecting the Internet" 

Georgetown University Undergraduate Law Review, Vol. V, Issue 1 (Summer 2019), pp. 52–59

An examination of personal data protections in the digital age using the European Union, China, and the United States as case studies to support the creation of a binding international agreement for data regulation.

Abstract

In an increasingly digital world, free speech and privacy laws in any given country have a growing impact on the lives of people across the globe, especially with regard to personal data protections. Unfortunately, there has yet to be any global and effective legally binding agreements to set a base level of protection for digital information on individuals. On one side of the debate, some countries argue that some level of censorship is necessary to prevent cybeterrorism and maintain social order. On the other, other countries and human rights organizations warn that censorship violates the human rights to freedom of speech, expression and privacy, making it easier for governments to quiet dissidents and spread false information. After analyzing the legal position of data protection, I recommend the ratification of legal protections for personal data, even if it is not as extensive as one could hope. In order to be effective, any treaty would have to create a supervising body and court for resolving disputes and offering advisory opinions. Hopefully, private corporations will take the lead, valuing employee and local input rather than profits alone.

Read More

!CORRECT SIZE 163 x 226.jpg

ANDREW SOMPLE

"Mass Incarceration and the Consequences of Disparate Drug Sentencing"

International Affairs ForumMay 8, 2020

Legal Reader.jpg

WILLIAM DU TERTRE

"Error 420: Problems Caused by State and Federal Legal Divergences"

Legal ReaderMay 21, 2020

The battle to legalize cannabis hasn’t seen much progress despite gaining significant popularity among people all around the country in recent years. It is one of the few issues today which hasn’t been polarizing and has received legal support from now over two-thirds of the American population, according to studies from the Pew Research Center. Despite the efforts of now almost 20 states and districts decriminalizing or recreationalizing the drug, the question becomes what’s holding back pot smokers from smoking pot legally in today’s times? 

Read More

Unasdftitled.jpg

KEVIN BLOODWORTH II

"Bleeding them Dry: America's Vampiric Relationship with Puerto Rico"

International Affairs Forum, December 30, 2019

America is heralded as a hope and beacon of democracy yet refuses to enfranchise over 4 million U.S. citizens in Puerto Rico. This lack of representation has cost Puerto Rico dearly, as America’s consistent violations of Puerto Rican’s human right to self-determination is the major factor contributing to Puerto Rico’s current economic crisis.

Read More

oxpollogo.jpg

PARKER ENNIS

"Our Day Will Come: The Inevitability of Irish Unification as Brexit Approaches"

The Oxford University Politics Blog, Oxford University Department of Politics and International Relations, January 7, 2019

Internal processes have led to a unified island increasingly becoming a greater possibility. The external shock of Brexit has accelerated these trends and made reunification near inevitable.

Read More

hhrj logo.jpg

BLOG ARTICLE 2 FORTHCOMING

Harvard Human Rights Journal Blog

Harvard Law School

Blog article forthcoming 2020

(Details will be posted once published.)

Unasdftitled.jpg

SALEM AMARE

"A Nobel Peace Prize With No Peace: Is Ethiopia the Next Rwandan Genocide in the Making?"

International Affairs Forum, January 6, 2020

The future of Ethiopia is uncertain but one thing remains clear: the ethnic violence is worsening. The government needs to acknowledge this harsh truth and take dramatic action, such as moving from ethnic federalism, a system that divides based on ethnicity,  to a proportional representative democracy. Unless Ethiopian leaders and the international community want another Rwanda on their hands, they can no longer stand by idly handing out peace prizes as violence among the ethnic groups escalates.

Read More

DC logo 326 x 452.jpg

LAUREN ZANE

"Ending the Global Assault on Protest"

Diplomatic Courier, January 6, 2020

The right to protest is under assault in most of the world today, from the most democratic to authoritarian. Protests have become increasingly criminalized by governments and decried as criminal in the press. Those without permits to protests are labelled as “illegal” or violent, but what constitutes violent or illegal protests? ... Often, governments mislabel legitimate protests as “violent” in order to stifle civil rights and eventually even justify violence and brutality against protesters.

Read More

DC logo 326 x 452.jpg

LAUREN ZANE

"AI and the Erosion of Freedoms"

Diplomatic Courier, November 15, 2019

AI is implicated in halting and limiting civil resistance. The ability to hold protests and to freely speak out against injustice is one of the most implicit freedoms that define liberal democracies. The critical question is: how much of our democratic freedoms are we willing to give up to advance technology?

Read More

Pace Law School.jpg

LIZ HOLMES

"A New Animal Rights Treaty Regime is Needed that Mirrors Human Rights Treaties: Animals aren’t Commodities, They Have Inherent Rights"

Animal Blawg: Blog of Animal Law, September 16, 2018

Maintained by Professor David N. Cassuto, Pace University School of Law

image2s.jpg

SOPHIA KINGSLEY

"Why Feminists Deserve Paternity Leave"

Center for Feminist Foreign Policy Online Journal, August 27, 2019

While there are many obstacles to address for women in the workplace, paid maternal leave must first be established as a basic human right globally.... Additionally, mandating the provision of paternity leave encourages men to take an active role in caregiving, institutionally reinforced by the expectation that he will take the paid time off.

Read More

GUULR.jpg

YINING LI

"Losing Citizenship: A Comparative Study on the Legal Issues of Returning ISIS Affiliates," 

Georgetown University Undergraduate Law Review, Vol. VI, Issue 1 (Spring 2020), pp. 23–30

Abstract

As coalition forces have taken back the territory occupied by ISIS militants, former ISIS participants and affiliates have encountered a new problem. While several countries have decided to readmit them as citizens, other countries have stripped them of their citizenship. According to Article 15 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, no person may be denied their nationality. This paper analyzes the legality of those countries' measures and discusses ISIS affiliates' human rights. It summarizes the background of ISIS and examines citizenship as a fundamental human right for ISIS affiliates. This paper categorizes those countries into two groups according to whether they are willing to repatriate the participants or not. With regard to countries rejecting the citizenship of ISIS participants, this paper evaluates four such countries' laws and argues that ISIS affiliates have the right to keep their citizenship and face a fair trial. Countries should openly accept them because their crimes cannot supersede the human rights of ISIS affiliates.

Read More

Unasdftitled.jpg

JULIA FILAN

"Ending Aid Dependency"

International Affairs Forum, December 26, 2018

Aid is provided with good intentions but often charities and NGOs don’t realize its harmful effect. It is imperative to restructure foreign aid to foster effective sustainable development.

Read More

SIR+Journal.jpg

TARRA OLFAT

"The Human Rights Violation of Sanction: U.S. Unilateral Sanctions and Iran’s Government" 

Journal of International Relations, March 10, 2020

Sigma Iota Rho Honor Society for International Studies

Unilateral sanctions, in particular, deter nearly all human rights, including the right to self-determination, the right to health, the right to education, the right to an adequate standard of living, and the right to development. Countries should no longer utilize unilateral sanctions as an instrument for influence.

Read More

Unasdftitled.jpg

JACK SHANGRAW

"Self-Determination Between Two Giants: Geopolitical Obstacles to Democracy in Nepal"

International Affairs Forum, December 30, 2019

If large countries are able to determine the modes of economic development, political systems, or internal policies open to their neighbors, they are denying them full membership as independent states in the international system. This poses a clear violation of the principle of self-determination as has been established in international law. Acting together, countries such as Nepal must work to expand the application of the right of external self-determination to indirect neo-colonial forms of domination.

Read More

JHU 163 x 226.jpg

ARTICLE 1 FORTHCOMING

Johns Hopkins Undergraduate Law Review

Article forthcoming 2020

(Details will be posted once published.)

Unasdftitled.jpg

GRAHAM WEINSCHENK

"The ‘Great Wall of Sand’ is Just the Beginning"

International Affairs Forum, December 28, 2018

Since as early as 1999, the People’s Republic of China has quietly been conducting one of the largest land reclamation projects in human history: the expansion of small islands and reefs in the South China Sea into sprawling military assets. Described by Admiral Harry Harris, US Ambassador to South Korea and former Commander of the United States Indo-Pacific Command, as a “Great Wall of Sand,” these islands pose a massive threat to stability in the region and around the world.

Read More

SIR+Journal.jpg

BRENDAN O'HALLORAN

"The Ethical Concerns of Drone and Automated Warfare" 

Journal of International Relations, January 28, 2019

Sigma Iota Rho Honor Society for International Studies

The war of the future is still one in which noncombatants are regularly harmed. Ultimately, the United States government’s current path on this matter is one that places effective warfare above ethical concerns. The only solution—one which seems increasingly unlikely—is to deescalate the usage of autonomous weapons.

Read More

Unasdftitled.jpg

CATIE BROWN

"Breaking Bad: The Dangers of the Shipbreaking Industry"

International Affairs Forum, January 16, 2019

Shipbreaking is most commonly carried out in low-income countries where labor is cheap, there are relatively fewer safety regulations, workers are desperate for jobs, and limited environmental regulations exist compared to high-income countries such as Germany or England. One of the leading problems of shipbreaking is the environmental impacts associated with its process. Environmental damage from shipbreaking includes soil contamination, air and water pollution, and biodiversity loss. For example, by 2009, Bangladesh had lost twenty-one of its fish and crustacean species due to water contamination from the shipyards.

Read More

JHU 163 x 226.jpg

ARTICLE 2 FORTHCOMING

Johns Hopkins Undergraduate Law Review

Article forthcoming 2020

(Details will be posted once published.)

C Journal 326 x 452.jpg

ARTICLE FORTHCOMING

The Claremont Journal of Law & Public Policy

Article forthcoming 2020

(Details will be posted once published.)

hhrj logo.jpg

BLOG ARTICLE 1 FORTHCOMING

Harvard Human Rights Journal Blog

Harvard Law School

Blog article forthcoming 2020

(Details will be posted once published.)

Unasdftitled.jpg

ANNE ALLEN HODGE

"Mississippi Blues Aren't Music, They're Trade Deficits"

International Affairs Forum, January 16, 2019

The economic losses due to the trade war are closing farms. These farms form the base of the state’s economies and lifestyles.... “These policies affect almost everyone I know. Agriculture is directly and indirectly one of the major employers in the US and is a huge part of the GOP for this country,” says Scott Cannada, Mississippi Farmer of the Year in 2011, when asked about the effects of the trade war policies on Mississippi’s farmers.

Read More

monitor-journal-of-international-studies

ARTICLE FORTHCOMING

The Monitor: Journal of International Studies, Vol. 25, Issue 2 (Spring 2020)

(Details will be posted once published.)

Spring-2017-Cover-232x300.png

ARTICLE FORTHCOMING

Journal of Undergraduate International Studies (JUIS)

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Article forthcoming 2020

(Details will be posted once published.)

© 2020 Jonathan Crock. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

  • LinkedIn - Grey Circle
  • Grey Twitter Icon
  • YouTube - Grey Circle